The Criterion Collection April Slate Will Be ‘Chilling, Sexy And Depressing’

We may only be in the last week of  January, The Criterion Collection with a little help from Sony Pictures are getting the coming months ready. April‘s slate for the UK has been revealed , which looks like it will be a ‘chilling,  sexy and depressing’.

On 4th April comes In Cold Blood the movie of Truman Capote‘s best selling book and a chilling account of crime and punishment in America.

3 weeks later on 25th April Love Jones, the smart, sexy, and stylish debut feature of writer-director Theodore Witcher—is a love story for anyone who has ever wondered: How do I know when I’ve found the one?

finally, also on 25th April arrives Make Way For Tomorrow, by Leo McCarey (An Affair to Remember).  The film is one of the great unsung Hollywood masterpieces, an enormously moving Depression-era depiction of the frustrations of family, aging, and the generation gap.

IN COLD BLOOD (1967) CRIME

Truman Capote’s best seller, a breakthrough narrative account of real-life crime and punishment, became an equally chilling film in the hands of writer-director RICHARD BROOKS (Cat on a Hot Tin Roof). Cast for their unsettling resemblances to the killers they play, ROBERT BLAKE (Lost Highway) and SCOTT WILSON (The Great Gatsby, The Walking Dead) give authentic, unshowy performances as Perry Smith and Richard Hickock, who in 1959 murdered a family of four in Kansas during a botched robbery. Brooks brings a detached, documentary-like starkness to this uncompromising view of an American tragedy and its aftermath; at the same time, stylistically In Cold Blood is a filmmaking master class, with clinically precise editing, chiaroscuro black-and-white cinematography by the great CONRAD L. HALL (American Beauty), and a menacing jazz score by Quincy Jones.

SPECIAL EDITION FEATURES
New 4K digital restoration, with 5.1 surround DTS-HD Master Audio soundtrack
New interview with cinematographer John Bailey on the film’s cinematography
New interview with film historian Bobbie O’Steen on the film’s editing
New interview with film critic and jazz historian Gary Giddins on the film’s music by Quincy Jones
New interview with writer Douglass Daniel on director Richard Brooks
Interview with Brooks from 1988 from the French television series Cinéma cinemas
Interview with actor Robert Blake from 1968 from the British television series Good Evening with Jonathan King
With Love from Truman, a short 1966 documentary featuring novelist Truman Capote, directed by Albert and David Maysles
Two archival NBC interviews with Capote: one following the author on a 1966 visit to Holcomb, Kansas, and the other conducted by Barbara Walters in 1967
Trailer
PLUS: An essay by critic Chris Fujiwara

USA | 1967 | 134 MINUTES | BLACK & WHITE | 2.35:1 | ENGLISH

LOVE JONES (1997) DRAMA, ROMANCE

Steeped in the bohemian cool of Chicago’s 1990s Black creative scene, love jones—the smart, sexy, and stylish debut feature of writer-director THEODORE WITCHER—is a love story for anyone who has ever wondered: How do I know when I’ve found the one? LARENZ TATE (Menace II Society) and NIA LONG (The Best Man) have magnetism and chemistry to burn as the striving, artistically talented twentysomethings—he’s a poet, she’s a photographer—who spark over their love of literature and jazz, but whose mutual reluctance to commit to a relationship leaves them both navigating an emotional minefield of confusion, jealousy, and regrets. Velvety cinematography; an unforgettable, eclectic soundtrack; sophisticated dialogue; and refreshingly low-key, naturalistic performances by an ensemble cast that also includes ISAIAH WASHINGTON, LISA NICOLE CARSON, BILL BELLAMY, BERNADETTE SPEAKES, and LEONARD ROBERTS come together in an intoxicating, seductively moody romance that engages both the heart and the mind.

DIRECTOR APPROVED SPECIAL EDITION FEATURES
New 4K digital restoration, supervised by director Theodore Witcher, with 5.1 surround DTS-HD Master Audio soundtrack
New interview with Witcher and film scholar Racquel J. Gates
New interview with music scholars Mark Anthony Neal and Shana L. Redmond on the soundtrack
Panel discussion featuring Witcher and members of the cast and crew
Trailer
English subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing
PLUS: An essay by critic Danielle A. Jackson

USA | 1997 | 109 MINUTES | COLOUR | 1.85:1 | ENGLISH

MAKE WAY FOR TOMORROW (1937) COMEDY, DRAMA

Make Way for Tomorrow, by LEO McCAREY (An Affair to Remember), is one of the great unsung Hollywood masterpieces, an enormously moving Depression-era depiction of the frustrations of family, aging, and the generation gap. BEULAH BONDI (It’s a Wonderful Life) and VICTOR MOORE (Swing Time) headline a cast of incomparable character actors, starring as an elderly couple who must move in with their grown children after the bank takes their home, yet end up separated and subject to their offspring’s selfish whims. An inspiration for Yasujiro Ozu’s Tokyo Story, this is among American cinema’s purest tearjerkers, all the way to its unflinching ending, which McCarey refused to change despite studio pressure.

SPECIAL EDITION FEATURES:
High-definition digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack
Tomorrow, Yesterday, and Today, an interview from 2009 featuring filmmaker Peter Bogdanovich discussing the career of director Leo McCarey and Make Way for Tomorrow
Video interview from 2009 with critic Gary Giddins, in which he talks about McCarey’s artistry and the political and social context of the film
PLUS: A booklet featuring essays by critic Tag Gallagher and filmmaker Bertrand Tavernier, and an excerpt from film scholar Robin Wood’s 1998 piece “Leo McCarey and Family Values”