If Beale Street Could Talk Will Come Home This June

A timeless love story featuring stand-out performances from the young cast and an Academy Award winning performance by REGINA KING (Best Supporting Actress), the critically-acclaimed IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK, starring KIKI LAYNE and STEPHAN JAMES, will be available to download and own on DVD and Blu-ray this June.

In early 1970’s Harlem, nineteen-year old Tish is in love with young sculptor and father of her unborn child Fonny. When Fonny is falsely accused of rape and imprisoned Tish and their families set out to clear his name before the baby is born. As they face an uncertain future, the young lovers experience a kaleidoscope of emotions – affection, despair, and hope – in a love story that evokes the blues in a place where passion, prejudice and sadness are inevitably intertwined.

Written and directed by Academy Award winning writer and director BARRY JENKINS (Moonlight – Winner, Best Picture Academy Award) and based on the stunning novel by iconic author JAMES BALDWIN IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK is the beautiful tale of how love and hope can endure the greatest of challenges.

Related: Film Review – ‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ (2019)

The Blu-Ray and DVD extras will include Commentary with director Barry Jenkins, Deleted Scenes (with optional commentary), Poetry in Motion, Photo Gallery.

If Beale Street Could Talk will be first released on Digital HD on 3rd June 2019, then on Blu-Ray and DVD from 17th June 2019.

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About Paul Devine

The founder of The People's Movies, started the site 20th November 2008.The site has excelled past all expectations with many only giving the site months and it's still going strong. A lover of French Thrillers, Post Apocalyptic films, Asian cinema. 2009 started Cinehouse to start his 'cinema education' learning their is life outside mainstream cinema. Outside of film, love to travel with Sorrento, Guangzhou and Manchester all favourite destinations.Musically loves David Bowie, Fishbone, Radiohead.

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