Renton Chooses Life In New T2:Trainspotting 2 Featurette


It’s nearly time to ‘choose life’ once again, as the long awaited Trainspotting sequel T2: Trainspotting ready to choose cinemas next month.

Ahead of its release Sony Pictures UK have sent us a new featurette called ‘Renton‘, Ewan McGregor‘s character, the pivotal character from the original movie. As you’ll see from the video it introduces the Renton of today and how he’s a changed man since we last saw him 20 years previously. But is he truly of the drugs?

First, there was an opportunity……then there was a betrayal.

Twenty years have gone by.Much has changed but just as much remains the same. Mark Renton (Ewan McGregor) returns to the only place he can ever call home.They are waiting for him: Spud (Ewen Bremner), Sick Boy (Jonny Lee Miller), and Begbie (Robert Carlyle).Other old friends are waiting too: sorrow, loss, joy, vengeance, hatred, friendship, love, longing, fear, regret, diamorphine, self-destruction and mortal danger, they are all lined up to welcome him, ready to join the dance.

From what we know is Renton has beaten that nasty Heroin addiction, but he may now have another addiction and is a runner too. So maybe that has a reason for him for returning home to Edinburgh rather than a grand reunion with his old buddies?

T2: Trainspotting is set for 27th January 2017 UK&Irish release date and co-stars Kelly MacDonald, Shirley Henderson and Irvine Welsh.

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About Paul Devine

The founder of The People's Movies, started the site 20th November 2008.The site has excelled past all expectations with many only giving the site months and it's still going strong. A lover of French Thrillers, Post Apocalyptic films, Asian cinema. 2009 started Cinehouse to start his 'cinema education' learning their is life outside mainstream cinema. Outside of film, love to travel with Sorrento, Guangzhou and Manchester all favourite destinations.Musically loves David Bowie, Fishbone, Radiohead.

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